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  Can I reuse the gasket once I open the unit?
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  The answer is no. Gaskets loose their memory over time, especially once it is compressed. The best way to ensure a tight seal after opening a unit is to install a new gasket every time. Units should never be opened without a good reason.
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  If I have thick carbon steel or corrosion resistant materials in my chiller, do I still need water treatment?
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  Absolutely, as many chiller failures are related to inadequate water treatment. All open and closed loop cooling systems with water or glycol should have corrosion inhibitors in them.
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  What information do you need to provide me a quotation?
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  Typically we need the type of fluids, temperatures in and out, and the thermal duty you expect it to do. Information about design pressure required, pressure drop allowable, and approved materials is also helpful.
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  Over time, my heat exchanger has lost performance. What can I do about it?
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  Usually, cleaning is required. This can be done either chemically or mechanically. Mechanical methods often involve running a vibrating brush through the inside of the tubes to remove any deposition . Some deposits require chemical cleaning using cleaning solutions. Please contact either Henry Technologies or your local chemical company to select the proper cleaning chemical and the correct procedure.
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  What can I do if I find a leaking tube?
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    A leaking tube means you should investigate the cause and determine if it's time to replace the unit. You can, however, put the unit back into service by simply plugging the leaking tube at both ends. Plugs are available from our service department.
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  Why use an oil separator?
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  A proper oil control system is essential to insure compressor lubrication and energy efficient cooling. Oil traveling through the system tends to build up in the evaporator, condenser, and vessels of an air-conditioning or refrigeration system. This caused a lack of oil return to the compressor until finally, in most cases, a large amount returns as a "slug" of oil, possibly damaging the compressor. By removing oil from the discharge gas of compressors, not only is the oil level for each compressor more accuratley controlled, the efficiency of the system is increased. Oil does not change phase from liquid to gas in an air-conditioning or refrigeration system and therefore makes a very poor refrigerant. Due to this, it will not pick up and reject heat nearly as well as refrigerant and a system will actually have to cool the oil as it tries to cool the evaporator, reducing the amount of heat the refrigerant can pick up. Oil also takes up volume through the system that otherwise could be filled with refrigerant, causing higher mass flow rates through the system. Additionally, oil tends to film the condenser tubing walls lowering heat transfer and as oil and refrigerant exits the expansion valve, the oil will foam, insulating the evaporator walls and again lowering heat transfer. In this manner, oil traveling through the system can affect efficiency very dramatically in a variety of ways.
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  How do I select an oil separator?
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  Oil separators collect very small oil particles from the gaseous refrigerant stream. To this end, velocity through the separator affects the separation efficiency. The smallest oil separator that will handle the evaporator capacity (tonnage) should be used. Note that the velocity through the discharge varies widely due to evaporator and condensing pressures and temperatures. Due to this, do not size an oil separator to the horsepower, suction cfm, compressor discharge valve size, discharge line size, or previous separator size. An under-sized oil separator may have too high velocity to effectively remove the oil and may return excessive hot discharge gas due to the float bouncing in the turbulence. An over-sized oil separator may yield inefficient separation or condense refrigerant internally which will feed from the float to the compressor. For more accurate selection, the discharge cubic feet per minute (DCFM) can be calculated for a wide range of condensing and evaporating conditions using charts available in our catalog.
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  By using an oil separator, do I still have to use oil traps in the piping?
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  An oil control system does not replace the need for proper system design. As oil control system will drastically reduce the amount of oil going through the system, however, suction traps, correct piping, and proper sizing of valves, controls, and components must still be implemented to insure the system will work properly.
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  Is the oil system worth the cost?
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  Oil separators and oil systems are inexpensive when considering the benefits they provide. An oil control system can be a very cost effective alternative to replacing expensive compressors due to loss of oil, in addition to the efficiency gain for keeping oil from traveling through the system. If installed correctly, an oil control system can give years of trouble-free operation and protect compressors from lack of oil and varying oil levels with little or no maintenance.
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  How does the separator feed the oil to the compressor?
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  In all oil control systems, a means to feed oil to the compressors without bypassing hot gas to the crankcases is needed. AC&R Components oil separators, an internal float in the oil separator accomplishes this. These floats will open to feed a few ounces of oil and close once the oil level has dropped . The float cycles as needed to return as much oil as the separator separates from the discharge.
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  What does the oil pre-change do?
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  The oil pre-charge is the amount of oil needed to just float the float ball. That amount will stay in the oil separator from then on. It cushions the float from vibration and gas turbulence; otherwise the float may be damaged on start-up. It seals the needle valve, helping to prevent gas from feeding with the oil. It also prevents the loss of that amount of oil from the compressor. The pre-charge can be added to the inlet or outlet on most oil separators or can be back-fed through the oil return fitting with a hand pump on installed oil separators.
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  What oil regulator should I use for my compressor?
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  Most people use an adjustable mechanical oil regulator such as the S-9130 or S-9090 for reciprocating compressors. These regulators are rated for 90 psi differential pressure (oil pressure minus crankcase pressure) and are adjustable between 1/4 and 5/8 sight glass. Fixed level regulators are available, but must be chosen according to the compressor manufacture's suggestions for oil level. Since these regulators cannot be adjusted they are rated for 30 psid instead of 90. For scroll or hermetic compressors, electronic oil regulators such as the S-9030 are typically used that include an oil level alarm to signal when oil level in the compressor has been lost. As adapter kit is required for any compressor without a standard 3 bolt 1 7/8" B.C. sight glass pattern.
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  How do I size a muffler?
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  AC&R Components catalog mufflers are sized by the line size. The baffles inside have openings that match the flow area of the connections. In general, the larger the muffler, the more pulsation noise they may take out, however, if the discharge line size is correct, a muffler with the same size compressor emits, but will not remove vibrations not the sound caused by them. A vibration eliminator may be required.
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  When do I use an accumulator and how do I size them?
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  Accumulators can help prevent damage to the compressor due to liquid flood-back or slugging. Anytime where there is the potential to have excessive liquid or oil return to the compressor, an accumulator should be used. This can be due to defrosts, inefficient oil separation, system start-up, cold ambient temperatures, varying load, or frosted coils. The accumulator catches liquid and oil and meters it back with the gaseous refrigerant. The accumulator should be sized between the minimum tonnage, required for proper oil return, and maximum tonnage, where pressure drop increases. The holding capacity is how much refrigerant the vessel will hold before it overfills and pours into the outlet. The accumulator should have a holding capacity large enough to catch the largest expected liquid slug. In general, 50% of the system charge is adequate.
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  When do I need a heat exchange accumulator or a heat band?
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  The heat exchange accumulators are meant solely to boil off excessive liquid and warm the oil to allow better flow while the system is running. By using the liquid line through the coil, the liquid line is sub-cooled whenever cold suction liquid has flooded the accumulator. This regains most the system efficiency lost due to incomplete boiling in the evaporator. When no liquid is present, very little heat transfer takes place, since the coil lies in the bottom of the vessel. To this end, heat exchange accumulators are mostly used on low-temperature systems or where frequent flood-back may be a problem. Heat bands can perform the same function by warming the accumulator shell, but will not regain efficiency losses. Heat bands, however, can help prevent refrigerant migration during off-cycles or boil off liquid refrigerant right after start-up, whereas the heat exchange accumulator will not, since it relies on the warm liquid to transfer heat.
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  Can I pipe the discharge line through the heat exchange coil on the accumulator?
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    No. Compressors rely on the suction gas temperature to cool internal components. The discharge line is much too hot and will cause the compressor to overheat.
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  How do I size a receiver?
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    Receivers are meant as a holding tank to feed liquid refrigerant only to the liquid line. They are essentially a hollow tank with an inlet and a dip-tube outlet. Size a receiver to the line size, making sure that the holding capacity is sufficient to allow the system's refrigerant to be pumped down into it.
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  What refrigerants are these products compatible with?
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    In general, all AC&R Components and Henry Valve products are compatible with all CFC, HCFC, &HFC refrigerants as well as mineral, alkyl-benzene, and polyolester oils. Both companies use Teflon or Neoprene compounds for seals, both of which have shown excellent compatibility with refrigerants and oils. Many components are available that are compatible with ammonia. Consult the factory with any questions concerning compatibility.
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  I'm having trouble with debris or sludge in my system, but I've changed my filters, what causes this?
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    In systems with POE oil, the oil will scavenge the system of debris that mineral or alkyl-benzene oil will not remove. Some systems can show problems within hours of start-up, even on brand new systems. Note that this is not necessarily due to improper installation techniques or contaminated system components. According to one POE oil manufacturer, this debris may be due to POE oil's incompatibility with oils used in manufacturing tube, pipes, and system components. Since filters trap particles of very small size, you may see excessive pressure drops across filters even though the filter looks okay. Eventually you may see problems with small orifices in expansion valves, solenoid valves, separator floats, accumulator oil returns, etc. It is important to change the liquid, suction, and oil return filter-driers more frequently with POE oil systems to prevent clogging of these system components. Three filter change-outs in the first three months and one after a year should be sufficient on most systems.
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  Do you need to install a check valve after the oil separator?
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    Yes. If you do not install a check valve liquid refrigerant will migrate from the condenser to the oil separator ultimately resulting in oil control problems.
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  What is the part number for the gasket on the oil float assembly?
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    The replacement gasket number is 2-023-001.
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  Is there a replacement gasket for the S-9450 level gauges?
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    The part number is 2-023-054.
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  Is there any way to troubleshoot the S-9400 level switches?
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    Yes, shine a flashlight on the face of the module for those units with N.O. contacts or the "A" versions. This action should close the contacts. Apply black-tape over the module and the contacts should then open. The reverse of this test can be done on modules that are N.C. Always use black-tape to cover the module. Light will penetrate your finger or thumb causing an untrue test.
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  Regarding level switches, what mode are the contacts in when relating to fluid?
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    For those standard units that are N.C. this means in the presence of fluid the contacts will be closed. For those units with contacts N.O. this means in the presence of fluid the contacts will be open. All units will remain N.O. with no power applied.

 


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